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Chinese Student 3rd Victim in Boston: Evokes Internet Discussion

04/17/2013 19:53

By Ariel Tian, Epoch Times | April 17, 2013 The third victim whose life was taken by the Boston Marathon explosions on April 15, 2013, a Chinese graduate student at Boston University. Her family requested her name not be released. (Weibo.com)

The third victim whose life was taken by the Boston Marathon explosions on April 15, 2013, a Chinese graduate student at Boston University. Her family requested her name not be released. (Weibo.com)


Approximately twelve years after 9/11, many people come to understand that terrorism is a global public enemy, for it targets people regardless of their nationality. ...

Li Chengpeng, Popular Blogger Activist
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The third victim in the Boston Marathon explosions was a Chinese graduate student at Boston University. Her parents did not wish to reveal her name, though it has been published in mainland Chinese media reports.

The young woman was from Shenyang in North East China. In the morning before the bombing, she posted on Weibo a picture of her breakfast of breads and fruits, and wrote “my wonderful breakfast.”

She and her classmate, Zhou Danling, went to see the Boston Marathon together. Zhou was injured during the explosion.

With the news confirming the death of the young woman, more than 6,000 netizens posted messages online, lamenting the unpredictability of human life.

A popular blogger and human rights activist Li Chengpeng wrote to his more than 7 million followers on April 17: “A Chinese citizen lost her life during the bombing in Boston. Please click on the [candle sign], to wish that she may rest in peace.

“Approximately twelve years after 9/11, many people come to understand that terrorism is a global public enemy, for it targets people regardless of their nationality and ethnicity, and kills not only Americans, but also Chinese.”

“Unfortunately, there are people like the following,” he wrote, followed by a list of several posts by people he said took great pleasure in someone else’s misfortune.

A message by “Plan together and support together 45418014″ read: “Any blow to U.S. imperial arrogance is a necessity. It is unfortunate that those who have died are all normal citizens. Very sad.”

A message by “Brilliant Talent with Great Policies 5460723,” read: “Because there is America, there are constant bombings in Iraq and Syria. The almighty God! Please take those explosives back to America.”

These posts and others like them were widely criticized, garnering more than 2,600 comments in 12 hours. Li’s post was also re-posted 6,700 times.

Such posts were not, however, the majority, unlike when the 9/11 attack hit the United States.

Writer Cao Junshu blogged to his more than 71,000 followers: “Back when 9/11 occurred, many Chinese were frenetic, jumping up and down hysterically in celebration that U.S. imperialism was hit. However, after the Boston bombing, almost nobody on the Internet posted any message that may indicate they were thrilled.”

“It was filled with condemnation and concern. After 11 years of development in the Internet, especially the increasing popularity of Weibo, many thoughts and global views of many Chinese people have took a drastic change. Nowadays, as the wisdom of people slowly begins to mature, official media and textbooks have all lost their power to brainwash people. People now understand that the United States is not an evil country,” Cao wrote.

Netizen “Xiaoshan Gentleman” blogged to his 113,000 followers, commenting on coverage by broadcaster CCTV (the regime’s mouthpiece): “Consecutive explosions in Boston could simply be covered in a single news report. On the contrary, CCTV has gone berserk, with non-stop news coverage of the Boston bombing since 6 in the morning. Every little bit of detail is not missed.”

“All I want to say to CCTV is, why couldn’t you put your energy to report on the bird flu in our country? [Or report on] poisoned food, corrupted officials, illegal demolition that leads to bloodshed, or environmental issues,” he wrote.

A Shanxi netizen compared how Americans are able react to the losses of their people, and how Chinese citizens are able react to the loss of the young Chinese woman in their more restrictive environment: “Americans can mourn for the victims of the bombing by lowering the flag at half mast. We can make new posts to Weibo and check new posts all day … and only light some candles. … To bring a sense of relief to the people, Americans can issue a statement that every measure is being taken to bring the perpetrators to justice. After any tragedy, our national propaganda machine goes on full throttle to bring emotional stability to the people.”

Tags: BostonBoston MarathonCCTVUnited States

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